Reflections

2016 is almost upon us, and it’s been an eventful year, to say the least. I thought I’d share with you some of the artistic highlights and other happenings of the year.

Firstly, I got a step closer to owning my own home. Now all that remains is to create some brand new paintings to brighten up the walls. Commissioning yourself to paint permanent artworks for your own walls…trickier than one might expect.

I embarked on some new painting projects, though admittedly my production rate was somewhat slower than previous years. However, I did complete my biggest project to date:

maltese-knight-door-painting-chloe-waterfield-art
The Artists Lodge, A Painted Maltese Door, 2015

I also had a collective exhibition which was featured on local news, and created a series of Arctic and Antarctic inspired works:

DSCF1764-1
Season of Change, 2015

But it seems that at various points during the year, I lost my way artistically and since then have been taking a step back and re-evaluating where I want to go. This process, surprisingly, has lead me to re-work some existing paintings instead of plunging ahead with new works. I like this back-tracking; I think it helps put things into perspective.

This was the first painting of the year, Axolotl:

16108_792001954200068_199260245533953879_n
Axolotl, 2015

It’s cute and slightly odd at the same time, but provokes questions from people who have never heard of or seen such a creature, which I like.

Perhaps my artistic stumbling block came as I was struggling with the pain and stress of endometriosis, with which I was diagnosed back in March. I’m learning to take this in my stride as much as possible, but it’s been an interesting adaptation. Thankfully I managed to sign what I can presume to be the last painting of the year, which is a re-work of a 2014 piece that I’ll talk about it my next blog.

I personally hope that next year will be brighter not for me but for all those who are currently suffering in the midst of civil war, terrorism and poverty. Topics which I think I’ll be tackling on canvas next year.

Thanks for following.

To find out more about commissioning a painting or to enquire about specific paintings for sale send me a message through my Facebook Page or take a look through at my website: cjwaterfieldart.com

Advertisements

Of Attenborough and Art

We’ve probably all heard about the case of another trophy hunter that mercilessly shot and killed one of Zimbabwe’s finest bull elephants. We’ve probably also heard this week how female sea turtles will soon run out of males to breed with thanks to a warming climate.

But this post isn’t about that. Why? Because I believe in providing hope, and encouraging drive to change the world, not through devastation, fear-mongering and finger-pointing, but by inspiring.

If we turn away from our laptops, Smartphones, fast food outlets and treadmills, and take a closer look at the world around us, we’ll realise what we’re missing, without being told how we’re destroying it and how selfish we are (however truthful this is).

Stopping to watch how ants seamlessly navigate their jenga-board environment carrying twigs three times their size, or watching bats zip past the electricity cables whilst you’re convinced you can here them ecolating; watching pigeons lay down like dogs and stretch out their tatty, greasy wings to bask in the October midday sun…even in the most understated urban environment, nature can be found.

So imagine then, what the wider world offers. One only has to catch a glimpse of base-jumping barnacle geese, peacock spiders flamenco dancing to their death and reindeer swimming across a 2 kilometre stretch of just-above-freezing water to feel a sense of awe. It is thanks to the wonderful work of David Attenborough and the passion and skill of his film-makers, that we are aware of many of the wonders that the natural world has to offer.

attenborough
Portrait of David Attenborough, Oils on Panel, 2014

And to me, wildlife art can do the same. Let’s not point fingers and say ‘look what you’ve done’, instead, let’s say ‘look at what you’re missing’.

Yes, climate change is real. Yes, species are dying at an alarming rate, and yes, humans are to blame. But we as the Greatest Ape are the only ones who can solve the problem. If only we’d stop to look at it.

DSCF1764-1
Season of Change, 2015

To find out more about commissioning a painting or to enquire about specific paintings for sale send me a message through my Facebook Page or take a look through at my website: cjwaterfieldart.com