What’s Your Perfect Art Studio?

The long sought-after art studio. A reality for many full and part-time artists, and for others, it’s more a makeshift place in a room of the house that your partner let you ‘take over’ (yes, that’s me). We often have the impression that art studios are massive, well-lit, expensive places, but that doesn’t have to be the case. The space that you paint in is crucial for producing paintings comfortably and privately, if you prefer. And while your space might not be perfect, there are some things you can do to improve it.

Light

My studio/spare room is not the finest example for natural light. If it’s a lovely sunny day (Malta = around 300 sunny days per year) then I can paint in a warm sunny glow, but still the light is far from perfect for photographing works. If your studio’s great for painting, but not for photographing, simply move the paintings elsewhere. I have a stunning roof that’s just perfect for the job – unless it’s windy!

Cosmic Painting
Photographing on the roof – non-windy day

Space

Unless you plan on working on some epic-sized canvases, then space isn’t really a huge issue. If you’re like me and have one too many paintings in your studio, get creative. There are numerous DIY art racks you can build, or simply get hanging and turn your studio into your own private gallery. You could host an open studio in no time.

 

Mess

Not a pre-requisite, but no doubt your once-pristine studio has now fallen into a bit of disarray. The carpet you swore you wouldn’t get paint on, the old ‘paint water’ and ‘not paint water’ debate?

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Time

Do you have a set time of day during which you find you paint better. Perhaps the kids are at school, you’re done from your day job, or you just find that your creativity works better from 11pm onwards. Whatever time painting suits you, go for it. If you don’t feel in the mood, don’t force it. Potter around the studio, get it tidied and organised, and fumble through some old works if you find yourself with half an hour of studio time.

Animals

If you’re anything like me, you need animals in your studio. From stuffed ones to the ones in the paintings, my favourite studio animals is Luna, pictured below. Downside: dog hairs stick to oil paint, and once the paint is dry, you’ve had it. Try to keep hairy pets away from wet canvases, at all costs!

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This painting was dry at the time, no fear!

Personality

Whether you’ve knocked it together from bits of old furniture, you’ve gone the whole ho with professional lighting and easels, or you’re just painting out of the back of a Model-A Ford (great idea, Georgia). Neat or messy, you’ve got to make your space your own. Add your unique personality to it with your favourite music, little keepsakes and sources of inspiration.

Your Studio

We all have different opinions on art, and for the same reason we all have different opinions on what makes a studio work. I’ve included some of my own thoughts above and what works for me, but I’d love to hear all about your studios in the comments.
Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook or Instagram (@cjwaterfieldart) to keep up with the latest in my studio. Hit the little ‘follow’ button on the left to subscribe to my blog. Thanks for reading! ๐Ÿ™‚

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