What Black Robins Can Teach Us About Conservation

“Isn’t it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too? “
– Douglas Adams

A 15cm high songbird that struggles to fly more than a few yards might not seem like conservation’s great success story, and in a way, it’s not, but the story of the black robin of New Zealand can teach us a lot about how and why small changes can make such a big difference.

In 1980 Old Blue was the only breeding female of a group of just five, the only five representatives of her species, which had been in rapid decline since the introduction of weasels and other foreign predators to their island home. With the dedication of a small team of conservationists, and the help of some unwitting tomtits, Old Blue became the sole progenitor for her entire species, and helped bring them back from the brink of extinction.

Though today, there are still only enough black robins to fill a few handfuls (around 200), this small success story speaks volumes for the small societal and political changes that we need to make, in order to make much bigger changes.

If one bird can inadvertently save her own species, the small changes that we can do as the human species, can help save the planet in big ways. It all starts with awareness. What might seem as something inconsequential can have a profound effect on an ecosystem. It’s not just about the big, eye-catching species that we see splashed all over the Vatican or the media; it’s about habitats, it’s about mentalities, and it’s about desire to change.

Read. Watch. Learn. Get to know about these little stories; get involved.

You too can join the Conservation Conversation. Click here to find out more.

Below are some more inspiring stories about conservation:

http://www.worldwildlife.org/pages/change-the-way-you-think

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/06/cecil-african-lion-anniversary-death-trophy-hunting-zimbabwe/

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jul/10/sea-otters-global-warming-trophic-cascades-food-chain-kelp

 

All paintings featured in this blog post are for sale unless otherwise specified. Enquiries may come to cjwaterfield@gmail.com

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