My Own Little Art History

A brilliant piece of advice I came across recently is that you need to learn about your own art history, not just that of the Great Masters and contemporary artists, and that’s what I’m going to talk about today.

I often work within specific themes or phases, but most recently these have been troubling me somewhat, and I’m trying to take a few steps back before I find the next big theme or style, but I can feel it stirring! So, now is as good a time as ever to talk about where my art came from.

It was in 2008 – 2009 when I first painted on canvas, and whilst early attempts were nothing to write home about it terms of technique, I love them for their rawness, their touches of surrealism and their honesty. I was painting what I felt like, with pretty much a disregard for rules.

Synesthesia, 2008

This painting, Synesthesia, explores the difficult and complex ties between our senses, and I believe was inspired by either a poem I wrote, or a conversation I had with a friend. Just as senses become blurred and intertwined, so is the specific memory of this piece. In execution it’s fairly poor, but I’d love to explore this theme again taking on what I’ve gathered over the last 8 years.

Dogs are Palaeolithic, 2010
The Spectrum, 2010

Moving on then, and it’s easy to see from experiments in surrealism where my next source of inspiration came from. Around this time I was fascinated by Palaeolithic cave art, and understanding where art and techniques came from as well as the significance of nature and animals in art. The piece above shows greater confidence with colour, handling of the paint and composition. In fact this was my first piece to sell at an exhibition.

I even started using natural materials such as shells, sand, stones and feathers on my paintings (though unfortunately not much photo evidence survives).


I’d say it took me four years to get properly into my stride; then there was this:

The Solutrean Expression, 2012

This piece put in to practice the influence that the cave painters and Franz Marc had somehow blended together in my brain. A combination of bold colour and line with simple structural elements to create a sense of the animal, the subject of the piece. Inspired by Lascaux’s Panel of the Chinese Horse and Red Cow, this is where art truly began its astonishing journey, and I guess in a way where mine started too.

This was a painting style that stuck.

Then became softer, more brushy and using colour to evoke mood…and this was all in the same year!

Then the works became even more textured, but with more colour control.

In 2014, I turned to painting people, and decided to highlight some of the endangered peoples and cultures all over the world, and once again the painting style changed drastically, becoming freer, and adapting to the different needs of the subject.

Spiritual Cosmos, 2014

In 2015, things became a little weirder. A series of events, preoccupations and responsibilities took  over for a while, and I think that reflects in my art. There were less concrete themes and styles, less experimenting and perhaps a little bit more fantastic indulging.



As for 2016, for now I’m going to leave this chapter in my little art history unpublished. It’s  too early to tell…

To find out more about commissioning a painting or to enquire about specific paintings for sale send me a message through my Facebook Page or take a look through at my website:



4 thoughts on “My Own Little Art History

    1. Thank you for your feedback, it was a very interesting process as I rarely reflect so far back. I wish I had photos of even earlier works but unfortunately they have been misplaced by life getting in the way after so many years!

      Liked by 1 person

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