The Art of Looking

I’m used to seeking inspiration for my art from grand, sweeping landscapes and details scenes, but with a new series of works in the pipeline, I’m going to change the way I look at things, focusing on the details and analysing anatomy and the senses with a new purpose.

Because when we stop to think about it, what is  it that really makes a species unique? Not its base anatomy surely; most vertebrates are made up of a head, body, limbs, an obvious front end and back end. Most have eyes and other sensory organs, most have a mouth. But the way that each species has evolved  has provided a pretty stunning collection of differences, ones that are often overlooked. Perhaps we overlook the elephant’s incredible sound-detector feet because we are distracted by the iconic trunk and ivory pricetags.

 

elephantPhoto by Matt Nelson

These new paintings will focus on the small and seemingly insignificant, almost abstract qualities, but each with its own unique story to tell.

My Style and What it Means to Me

Recently, I’ve varied in style quite a bit; I’ve painted some pretty abstracted works, a couple of portraits and peoples of varying ethnicities and generally limited the amount of animals featuring in my paintings.

So why is it one always feels so drawn back to that one particular style? Their one unique little niche in the art world that just keeps hanging around.

For me, it is my ‘Solutrean’ style paintings, named for the first painting created in that style: The Solutrean Expression. What started off as modern interpretation of the Lascaux cave‘s Panel of the Red Cow and Chinese Horse has developed into a bold and I hope original style that is able to express so many of my desires: conservation, protection and admiration of the natural world.

Chloe Waterfield Art Oil Paintings Malts
The Solutrean Expression – the signature piece.

This style, I feel, best incorporates the true values of nature; those unique aspects of those unique creatures, their movements, their unusual anatomy, or simply those unfortunate ones who are no longer on this planet.

Thylacine Oil Painting Tasmanian Tiger Chloe Waterfield Art

Thylacine (Tasmanian Tiger) – The poor Tazzy Tiger, wrongly accused of killing sheep throughout New Zealand, and all too soon exterminated. The last Thylacine died in Hobart Zoo in 1936. (This painting is for sale. Enquiries may come to cjwaterfield@gmail.com)

The ‘Solutrean’ style can offer total colour freedom or can work for a limited palette, and so everytime the results are surprising, and the majority of the times a pleasant surprise. A rich blend of colour to me evokes vast emotions, both negative and positive in one fell swoop, and once you get to know each one’s unique story, this emotion is only heightened.

Symbiosis Oil Paintings Malta Chloe Waterfield Art
Symbiosis – The intricate relationship between one of Africa’s largest and most dangerous mammals, the Buffalo, and the humble oxpecker, dedicated to cleaning the ticks and parasites off these majestic beasts.  (This painting is for sale. Enquiries may come to cjwaterfield@gmail.com)

Now tell me about your own style of art and what it means to you!